Infrastructure Support recruitment

Our clients range from established local businesses to dynamic SMEs and blue-chip companies around Suffolk and Essex, and their infrastructure needs vary accordingly from help desk support to building servers or a full infrastructure refresh.

Sometimes a business can only be as good as the systems, software and hardware that support it. Infrastructure Support plays a vital role in solving problems, improving facilities, offering training and advice, and generally helping companies of all sizes to function efficiently and do the best job they can.

Whether you are a generalist or a specialist, looking for a permanent or contract role, we’ll know exactly which company will be the right fit for you.

Harry Dibbs
Infrastructure Support

Harry is our networks and infrastructure specialist for the East of England region. Harry is an enthusiastic and engaging recruiter who believes no challenge is too great. He has a keen interest in the real world application of IT infrastructure and enjoys learning from the people in the industry, absorbing their knowledge in the process.

Harry joins us from Hays, where he spent over three years recruiting for the likes of BT, AXA, and AstraZeneca as well as many other large clients. Prior to that, Harry worked in customer service for a local energy company, honing the people skills that have since made him such a natural recruiter.

Latest Infrastructure Support Jobs
Web Application Support
Division Infrastructure Support
Job Type Permanent
Location Ipswich
Salary £22,000 - £28,000
Specialist Harry Dibbs
Bristow Holland have an exciting position for a Web Application Support to join a growing business based in Ipswich.
1st Line IT Support Engineer
Division Infrastructure Support
Job Type Permanent
Location Ipswich
Salary £20,000 - £25,000
Specialist Harry Dibbs
Bristow Holland have an excellent 1st Line IT Support opportunity working for an expanding business based in Ipswich.
FAQ
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Our top questions
How do I get into Infrastructure Support?

The most straightforward route into Infrastructure Support is via a good degree in Computer Science with experience or a specific interest in networking. This should help you appeal to prospective employers. Apprenticeships will also help you to get a foot on the ladder into a service desk post, and with experience you will be able to progress from there.

What is the career path in Infrastructure Support?

Entry-level roles would be at a service desk position initially, if you’re not degree-qualified, then progressing to IT Support, IT Analyst, and further to Systems Administrator and Infrastructure Engineer and Analyst. After this, you would specialise and branch off into aspects of infrastructure management like storage, messaging, networking, security or a managerial position.

How much should I expect to earn in Infrastructure Support?

Salary for an entry-level role on a service desk would start at £16k-17k (apprenticeships usually £10k), progressing to around £45k a year for the most senior engineer positions.

Do certifications or qualifications matter for Infrastructure Support jobs?

They can help back up your candidacy, but the reality is that if you have experience in the right areas for a particular role, then we will personally talk to employers who might have skipped a CV about how you are the most fitting engineer for the job. Knowing your way around certain systems, networks and servers can carry more weight than any qualification on paper.

What should I be targeting in my next Infrastructure Support job?

The hot topics and skill-sets that we are seeing right now in this field are cyber security, the Cloud, storage, virtualisation and networking. With more and more storage, networking and business being conducted online, demand for engineers with knowledge in these areas is only going to carry on growing.

When is the best time to leave my current Infrastructure job?

You will know when you should leave your current job in infrastructure support when you can see there is no progress taking place at the company. You might notice that your department is not keeping pace with the latest developments in hardware, the Cloud, or virtual networks, nor reaching out to new clients. This is a sign that eventually you will only be dealing with heritage technology and your knowledge and value in the industry will fall behind that of most contemporary engineers. If you want to keep progressing in your career, then this is the point you need to assess your options and see what else might be out there for you.

The most straightforward route into Infrastructure Support is via a good degree in Computer Science with experience or a specific interest in networking. This should help you appeal to prospective employers. Apprenticeships will also help you to get a foot on the ladder into a service desk post, and with experience you will be able to progress from there.

Entry-level roles would be at a service desk position initially, if you’re not degree-qualified, then progressing to IT Support, IT Analyst, and further to Systems Administrator and Infrastructure Engineer and Analyst. After this, you would specialise and branch off into aspects of infrastructure management like storage, messaging, networking, security or a managerial position.

Salary for an entry-level role on a service desk would start at £16k-17k (apprenticeships usually £10k), progressing to around £45k a year for the most senior engineer positions.

They can help back up your candidacy, but the reality is that if you have experience in the right areas for a particular role, then we will personally talk to employers who might have skipped a CV about how you are the most fitting engineer for the job. Knowing your way around certain systems, networks and servers can carry more weight than any qualification on paper.

The hot topics and skill-sets that we are seeing right now in this field are cyber security, the Cloud, storage, virtualisation and networking. With more and more storage, networking and business being conducted online, demand for engineers with knowledge in these areas is only going to carry on growing.

You will know when you should leave your current job in infrastructure support when you can see there is no progress taking place at the company. You might notice that your department is not keeping pace with the latest developments in hardware, the Cloud, or virtual networks, nor reaching out to new clients. This is a sign that eventually you will only be dealing with heritage technology and your knowledge and value in the industry will fall behind that of most contemporary engineers. If you want to keep progressing in your career, then this is the point you need to assess your options and see what else might be out there for you.