Software Development Recruitment

We handle IT recruitment for all kinds of firms, from SMEs to established local businesses and blue chip companies in Essex and Suffolk, and know exactly which team will be the best fit for you.

Software is constantly evolving to keep up with changes in technology, access to information, lifestyles, and demands of both the consumer and the client. People are used to convenience and new ways of bringing what they need to their fingertips.

Software companies will always have a demand for experienced and innovative developers who can transform existing products or platforms, enhance the interaction with applications, and create new software to satisfy their client base.

Matthew Foot
Software Development

Matt is the specialist software recruiter in the team, having spent years developing an in-depth understanding of the technical skills, working environments and major players in the development industry in the region.

His exclusive network of software engineers and developers was built by solid word-of-mouth recommendations, and his reputation marks him out as a reliable source of guidance to clients and candidates alike. He’s worked hard to build trusted relationships and place people in exactly the right positions to bring the greatest benefit to both businesses and careers.

Matt knows finding a new job or sourcing a new team member can be a challenging time, and he is determined to provide a positive, stress-free experience to everyone he works with. He is focused on giving you worthwhile and viable options that will enable you to build a structured career path or to enhance your team. Drop him a line to find out how he can help you today.

What particularly sets Matt apart is he does genuinely care about getting the right role for you.

Software Engineer, Suffolk

Are you ready to make a move, or expand your IT team? We’d love to meet up. Our approach is defined by how we get to know the people we work with, enabling us to send the right candidate to the right interview. Get in touch now, and we’ll personally guide you through the process to see where you could go next.

Latest Software Development Jobs
Junior Software Developer
Division Software Development
Job Type Permanent
Location Ipswich
Salary £20,000 - 25,000
Specialist Matthew Foot
Colchester based organisation are currently seeking a Junior Software Developer to join their expanding development team.
Senior Java Developer x 2
Division Software Development
Job Type Permanent
Location Ipswich
Salary £60,000 - 70,000
Specialist Matthew Foot
We are currently seeking two experienced Java Developers to join an expanding software business who are developing cutting edge, multi-functional financial applications.
FAQ
1 | 6
Our top questions
How do I get into Software Development?

There are two ways to start a career as a software developer. The first is the conventional route through a degree in Computer Science, or an apprenticeship degree, and then refining your field of interest or specialism from there.

But there is a second way that is becoming far more common. Children are learning about coding and programming at a very early stage in school, or by working with simple, accessible hardware like a Raspberry Pi. Talented kids are creating their own successful software and applications in the process, reacting to things they need in their everyday lives. With that kind of mind, you don’t need a degree to prove your worth – if you show talent and stand out, you’ll be an attractive prospect to a software firm.

What is the typical career path for a Software Developer?

he career path for a software developer is fairly linear. Entry level is as a Junior Developer, then with experience you progress to Developer, then Senior Developer. Beyond this, you may become a Development Team Manager, coordinating development projects with many specialists, or a Development Architect, building new software and applications from scratch.

How much do Software Developers get paid?

In an entry-level position, a Junior Developer should expect a salary of around £20k. At the other end of the scale, Development Managers and Development Architects can expect to be paid £60k-70k, or even higher if they are working on high-profile or high-value software projects.

What qualifications or certifications do I need to be a Software Developer?

It can be useful to have a Computer Science degree, and there are a few specific certifications available. If you are looking to skill into an area you haven’t worked in before, it’s a good idea to take a course specific to the skills you need.

However, in this field we know that it doesn’t matter about your qualifications if you have the talent and experience to do the job. This is why we like to get to know you and find out as much as we can about your track record – we have the influence to get you into an interview on proven experience, not just on what qualifications are listed on your CV.

What technology or skills should I target for my next Software Developer job?

There is no definite answer to this question. The best thing to do is check what skills people are currently looking for. Research as many job listings as you can, or talk to a recruitment agent, or ask people you know working in the area you want to reach into.

Right now, skills you would want to target are modern versions of various languages – C#, Javascript, MVC, ASP.NET, etc. This answer is different to what it would have been 5-10 years ago, and it will be different again in 5-10 years time. The best advice is to keep up with all the new developments in your field.

At what point should I consider becoming a contractor?

You might be getting a nagging feeling that you’ve got as far as you can go in your current place or work, or reached a ceiling on your earning potential in a permanent job. If you’re the best developer on your team, then it’s likely you are of the right calibre to take the next step and become the kind of specialist that software firms and larger companies will want to hire on a contract basis.

For contractors, the money is good are you are paid a premium for your skills, but it can be a lone wolf existence where you will have to run your own business, accounting, taxes, invoicing, etc. For those whose skills are always in demand, it can be a path to increased personal freedom and a boost to your value and self-esteem.

There are two ways to start a career as a software developer. The first is the conventional route through a degree in Computer Science, or an apprenticeship degree, and then refining your field of interest or specialism from there.

But there is a second way that is becoming far more common. Children are learning about coding and programming at a very early stage in school, or by working with simple, accessible hardware like a Raspberry Pi. Talented kids are creating their own successful software and applications in the process, reacting to things they need in their everyday lives. With that kind of mind, you don’t need a degree to prove your worth – if you show talent and stand out, you’ll be an attractive prospect to a software firm.

he career path for a software developer is fairly linear. Entry level is as a Junior Developer, then with experience you progress to Developer, then Senior Developer. Beyond this, you may become a Development Team Manager, coordinating development projects with many specialists, or a Development Architect, building new software and applications from scratch.

In an entry-level position, a Junior Developer should expect a salary of around £20k. At the other end of the scale, Development Managers and Development Architects can expect to be paid £60k-70k, or even higher if they are working on high-profile or high-value software projects.

It can be useful to have a Computer Science degree, and there are a few specific certifications available. If you are looking to skill into an area you haven’t worked in before, it’s a good idea to take a course specific to the skills you need.

However, in this field we know that it doesn’t matter about your qualifications if you have the talent and experience to do the job. This is why we like to get to know you and find out as much as we can about your track record – we have the influence to get you into an interview on proven experience, not just on what qualifications are listed on your CV.

There is no definite answer to this question. The best thing to do is check what skills people are currently looking for. Research as many job listings as you can, or talk to a recruitment agent, or ask people you know working in the area you want to reach into.

Right now, skills you would want to target are modern versions of various languages – C#, Javascript, MVC, ASP.NET, etc. This answer is different to what it would have been 5-10 years ago, and it will be different again in 5-10 years time. The best advice is to keep up with all the new developments in your field.

You might be getting a nagging feeling that you’ve got as far as you can go in your current place or work, or reached a ceiling on your earning potential in a permanent job. If you’re the best developer on your team, then it’s likely you are of the right calibre to take the next step and become the kind of specialist that software firms and larger companies will want to hire on a contract basis.

For contractors, the money is good are you are paid a premium for your skills, but it can be a lone wolf existence where you will have to run your own business, accounting, taxes, invoicing, etc. For those whose skills are always in demand, it can be a path to increased personal freedom and a boost to your value and self-esteem.